D&D Premise: Lord of the Flies

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Where do goblins come from?

While only the most skeptical of city-dwellers, insulated from the terrors of the wilderness, would opine that there are no such things as goblins, those that have encountered them are largely at a loss to explain their origin. Though many a hero for law and goodness has worried about the ethical conundrum that would entail from finding innocents of the species, none know of such a thing ever happening. Occasionally, a nest or warren of them is found that, if squinted at, seems like a cruel mockery of a town, but there is no real evidence of a greater culture or interaction with other goblin groups. Most religions write them off as merely the sins of the kith personified, to be killed on sight.

They’re not far wrong.

Another great mystery of the world is the nature of heroism. If a city gets large enough, it begins to train advanced techniques in the pursuit of battle, craft, and magic. Those that spend years and years training at colleges and gaining experience in the world can become extremely competent. Most humans and similarly-lived kith may master complex techniques equivalent to the third circle of magic before they enter their dotage, but it takes the lifespan of the elves to truly master such techniques. Still, only the most ancient of the elves, sequestered deep in their lands, profess to understand magics of the ninth circle.

Yet, there are constant tales of small groups of adventuring heroes that seem to have mastered skills while still young that rival the eldest scholars of the land. They don’t like to speak of what makes them different, if they understand at all.

There is a theory called spontaneous generation. While learned sages with an interest in experimentation are convinced that flies work much like moths, laying eggs that grow into maggots as a larval form before eating enough offal to become flies themselves, most common folk do not have access to this science. As far as they know, maggots and flies are spontaneously generated from rotting meat. When they leave meat to rot, maggots appear as if from nowhere, and flies thereafter.

They think the same thing about goblins, and they’re missing the point in exactly the same way.

Goblin hierarchies don’t make much sense. If they didn’t look similar in general shape and work with one another when no one else will, none would believe that the cowardly goblin, organized hobgoblin, and bestial bugbear were of one race. Were any hero to ever find evidence of a goblin civilization, it would have to explain much about the processes that could result in such differentiation in both size and temperament. Why are there no cowardly hobgoblins or organized bugbears? Does growing past a certain size change their entire mental state?

It all comes down to the flies.

Goblin flies are distinctive, if you look closely enough: greenish and with a goblinish cast to their features. Few have made a study of the differences, because they come in a swarm unaware on small villages far from scientists, and few kith tend to survive to spread the tale. First, they bite the livestock and small animals they can catch. The beasts get sick, and many of them die from the strange pox. If you don’t burn the bodies quickly enough, the larval goblins within manage to eat enough to burst free, fully formed. Their first task is to try to add more offal to the piles of their nascent siblings, creating enough rotting meat to build a whole goblin. Some say, in the death throes of the illness, the smallest animals are driven to seek out piles of other dead to add their own meat to the stores. Deep in the woods, sometimes a big predator falls ill. While prey and vermin universally produce the small goblins, a big enough predator can result in a bugbear. Those that named it must have known better than any ever guessed what was going on.

Kith are harder to bite, and tend to resist the illness better, in the early days. But as the goblins kill the livestock, foul the fields and the water, and wear down the town’s guards with their attempts at incursions, it becomes harder and harder to stay healthy. Once the disease takes, the people fall just as ill as the livestock. There’s something about the minds of the kith that speaks to the growing goblin, and so the hobgoblins that burst forth from kith corpses share the kith tendency towards organization and structure that their brethren born of beasts lack. Never think of them as your loved ones turned into hobgoblins: that’s not your friend, it’s what ate her from within. Any similarities are just echoes of her mind that the larvae picked up.

Sometimes, though, an infection gets resisted. The healthy, or just the lucky, overcome the disease, purging it from their systems. But something of the magic remains. Perhaps it was the soul triumphing over the evil of the goblin plague, or the strange effects of magical fever dreams, but the survivors gain powers. For kith, this is one way that an adventurer is born: somehow, it’s much easier and faster to pick up the skills of battle, craft, and magic than for others. For beasts, this is often how the stranger magical creatures arise.

Adventurers don’t like to talk about it, because for many of them their first adventure was using their newfound strengths to purge the goblin infestation from what was once their idyllic village home. Often there’s not much left. They adventure because everything they know is gone and, if they’re honest, they’re seeking an answer to what happened to their families.

It’s clear that the goblin flies aren’t natural. They choose their targets. They come when those villages are least able to defend them. Somewhere, there’s a malevolent intelligence directing these swarms to bring ruin upon the lives of well-meaning settlers and peasants:

A lord of the flies.

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Troupe-Style Secret Identity Supers

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One of my favorite parts of comics and long-form supers stories (e.g., TV series) is the ability to spend a lot of time focused on the personal lives of superheroes, particularly out of costume. This tends to be completely lost in video games, and is hard to include in tabletop RPGs. It’s difficult to lavish a lot of spotlight on the detailed NPC interactions of one member of the team.

I think that a lot of the latest crop of supers media, particularly the Defenders-verse, points at a way to dig into this style of play a little more. You just need your players to be comfortable:

  • Having multiple PCs, most of whom are supporting cast for other players’ superhero PCs
  • Switching characters frequently between scenes (in the style of Fiasco or similar story games)

The possible benefits of this style include:

  • The GM can include plotlines where PCs aren’t just reactive to the problem of the week: investigations and personal life can be much more player-directed
  • Players are much more likely to have a PC they can bring into a scene, even if it’s not their main
  • There’s a much finer-grained level of risk than normal supers plots: it’s much easier to threaten and even kill supporting cast PCs without taking the player out of the game

Practically, this style of play means:

  • Each player has a main (superhero) PC with a full character sheet, and at least one secondary PC for each other player. The secondary characters likely have slimmed down character sheets (either just by virtue of not having powers, or actually stripped down to just their most salient traits for ease of reference; for speed of play, they might even start with just a few salient traits and gradually build to full sheets as they’re played).
  • The secondary PCs are fixtures in their associated main PC’s life. Some of them may know about the character’s heroics. Some may have reasons to be in her life due to strong secret identity ties. All of them are important enough to the main PC to want them around in many circumstances, but who should not just be totally on board with all the hero’s decisions (i.e., there should be tensions to play for conflict, but the secondary PCs will almost always stand by their main PC when it’s important).
  • The GM should switch viewpoints between main PCs living their lives apart from the other main PCs. Each switch to another main PC should be aggressively framed to draw in secondary PCs (e.g., “you’re just getting home from the fight and your wife is waiting up…”). The overall scene framing should probably try to balance out player screen time (e.g., if the first scene is Hero A and her wife, the next scene should be some combination of the players that weren’t playing Hero A or her wife).
  • As in most round-robin style play, I suggest having a strong social contract about metagaming, but allowing everyone to be present to watch scenes where none of their PCs are present (with an eye to letting them jump in if suddenly one of their PCs is relevant).
  • A session’s plots should probably be thematically linked to one another even when they don’t connect, and often should serve to draw the main PCs together (e.g., Hero A and Hero B were working the same case all along). Sessions, or at least story arcs, build up to team-ups of the full super group. Even when just a pair of heroes meet, they could include members of their supporting cast played by the other players.

For character generation:

  • Create a bunch of cards with common relationship tropes (suggestions below).
  • While making characters, have each player take turns to claim a relationship card from the pile for a type of relationship that makes sense for that hero PC (e.g., “I want my hero to have a sibling, a significant other, a police contact, and a mentor”).
  • Put the hero’s name on the card, and slightly customize the role (e.g., Player A takes the “SO” card and labels it “Hero A’s Girlfriend”).
  • Haggle with the other players to see who’s interested in playing which of your roles. Ultimately, each other player should have at least one of your supporting characters. (If you have a strong gender imbalance at your table, try not to force the one guy/girl to play everyone else’s SOs: that’s not cool.)
  • Work out some high level details about the secondary character between the hero player and the holding player so both players are happy with the potential interactions.
  • If it makes sense to all players involved, a player might combine two secondary character cards into one PC (e.g., Player B decides Hero A’s girlfriend doesn’t know about her lover’s alter ego, but is actually Hero C’s spy contact, and it will be a surprise to everyone once those connections and secret jobs come out).
  • Once all relationships are settled, come up with stats for the secondary PCs using whatever method the GM has set up.

Suggested relationship types include:

  • Parental Figure: A parent or guardian makes an excellent foil/support.
  • Dependent: If you have a child or ward, it’s likely a teen old enough to actually be meaningfully onscreen.
  • Sibling: Your brothers and sisters are going to find out you’re a superhero.
  • Crush: This is not someone that doesn’t even know you exist, probably, because the tension is hanging out with feelings left unspoken.
  • SO: Many heroes have the tension of whether they can ever have a committed relationship in the business.
  • Spouse: You’re married, but does your spouse know you’re a hero?
  • Ex-SO: You still interact regularly, so why did you break up and why are you still on good enough terms for screen time?
  • Best Friend: Have you told your best friend? If not, is she really your best friend?
  • Confidant: This may not actually be a good friend, but it’s someone who knows your secret and is, thus, involved.
  • Enabler: This is someone who knows your secret enough to cover for you while you’re heroing.
  • Work Partner: This is either a business partner, police partner, or someone that’s otherwise so close to you at work that your absences definitely affect her.
  • Employee: This may be your personal assistant who’s totally clued in, or one of your many employees that’s closest to you and may know your secret.
  • Boss: Your boss should probably have a little more relevance in your life than work, unless most of your secondary characters and secret identity plots are work-related.
  • The Help: Are you rich enough to have a butler or man/girl Friday? Is that nice?
  • Sidekick: You can certainly have a sidekick, as long as the relationship is such that she doesn’t come along on your big team-up missions for some reason.
  • Mentor: This is likely the retired hero that got you into the business, but may be a more mundane mentor figure that’s not a boss or parent.
  • Friendly Rival: This town may be big enough for another super that you encounter frequently, who you’re grudgingly friendly with and team up with sometimes, but who has no interest in participating in your big team-ups.
  • Tech/Gear Provider: Do you have a costume guy? Do you have a gadget lady? You should get at least one of those. They’re great.
  • Hacker/Operator: For many heroes, it’s useful to have a computer-savvy person in the chair/van that can hack things, research for you, and otherwise provide remote tech support.
  • Handler: If you’re heroing for a (quasi-)government agency or mega-corp, you probably have a handler/liaison.
  • Spy Contact: This friend probably shouldn’t be operating on domestic soil… unless at least one of you isn’t on domestic soil, and you’re friends anyway.
  • Law Enforcement Contact: Every good hero has a friend in the police/FBI to go to for procedural help and the occasional backup.
  • Criminal Contact: Some heroes cultivate a CI or are just bent enough to not mind the small crimes, and that kind of contact can get you useful illicit information, substances, or documentation.
  • Lawyer: Particularly on the street level and/or with a public identity, it’s important to be on good terms with your lawyer.
  • Medical Worker: You really want to be friends with some kind of plucky EMT or doctor that makes house calls and can fight a ninja or two in a pinch.
  • Investigator: If your own skills don’t bend toward investigation, a friendly gumshoe is a great help in finding information.

D&D 5e: Mutant (Rogue Subclass)

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This is primarily intended to provide a Charisma alternate for Arcane Trickster. It’s probably also fairly easy to convert to an alternate Eldritch Knight.

Many individuals with the blood of supernatural creatures in their family trees or who were invested with a surge of chaotic energy become sorcerers, able to unleash titanic magics. Others are less robust in their expression of these powers. They gain a few useful tricks from their magic-infused blood, but not enough to see them through life. They tend to express signs of their powers, either obviously in their appearance or in the inexplicable accidents that happen around them as they grow up. They, in short, are frequently forced out and must turn to a life of crime, or at least an upbringing on the fringes. Adventuring is often the only way they can be accepted in society, for as accepted as adventurers are.

Spellcasting

When you reach 3rd level, you gain the ability to cast spells.

Cantrips. You learn three cantrips based upon your mutations (see below). You learn another cantrip at 9th level when you gain your latent mutation (see below).

Spell Slots. You gain spell slots as an Arcane Trickster.

Spells Known of 1st-Level and Higher. You know three 1st-level spells. The Spells Known column of the Arcane Trickster Spellcasting table shows when you learn more spells of 1st level or higher. Each of these spells must be drawn from your personal spell list based upon your mutations (see below) or the spells available to all mutants because they are Hated and Feared (see below).

Whenever you gain a level in this class, you can replace one of the mutant spells you know with another spell of your choice from your personal spell list. The new spell must be of a level for which you have spell slots.

Spellcasting Ability. Charisma is your spellcasting ability for your mutant spells, since they are produced from your innate magical energy. You use your Charisma whenever a spell refers to your spellcasting ability. In addition, you use your Charisma modifier when setting the saving throw DC for a mutant spell you cast and when making an attack roll with one.

Spell save DC = 8 + your proficiency bonus + your Charisma modifier

Spell attack modifier = your proficiency bonus + your Charisma modifier

Primary Mutations

Starting at 3rd level, you gain three mutations. Each mutation grants you a permanent special ability, a cantrip, and a list of spells that you may add to your personal spell list when selecting spells known.

Mutation Special Ability Cantrip Spells (1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th)
Ceraunokinitic Resist Thunder Thunderclap (XGE) Thunderwave, Shatter, Thunder Step (XGE), Storm Sphere (XGE)
Clairvoyant Gain Expertise in Investigation, Perception, or Stealth True Strike Detect Magic, Darkvision, Clairvoyance, Locate Creature
Communicative Gain Expertise in Insight or Perception Message Comprehend Languages, Detect Thoughts, Tongues, Divination
Constructive Gain Expertise in all tools with which you are proficient Mending Mage Armor, Enhance Ability, Protection from Energy, Fabricate
Cryokinetic Resist Cold Ray of Frost Ice Knife (XGE), Shatter*, Sleet Storm, Ice Storm
Dimensional Gain Expertise in Deception, Performance, or Sleight of Hand Prestidigitation Feather Fall, Blur, Blink, Banishment
Dominant Gain Expertise in Deception, Intimidate, or Persuasion Friends Charm Person, Suggestion, Enemies Abound (XGE), Charm Monster (XGE)
Electrokinetic Resist Lightning Shocking Grasp Witch Bolt, Misty Step*, Lightning Bolt, Dimension Door*
Entropic Resist Acid Acid Splash Chromatic Orb, Knock, Dispel Magic, Polymorph
Illusory Gain Expertise in Intimidation, Performance, or Stealth Minor Illusion Silent Image, Invisibility, Major Image, Greater Invisibility
Immune Resist Force Blade Ward Shield, Mirror Image, Counterspell, Stoneskin
Luminous Resist Radiant Light Magic Missile, See Invisibility, Daylight, Sickening Radiance (XGE)
Mesmeric Resist Psychic Dancing Lights Color Spray, Hold Person, Hypnotic Pattern, Confusion
Nightmarish Resist Necrotic Chill Touch Ray of Sickness, Blindness/Deafness, Fear, Blight
Pyrokinetic Resist Fire Fire Bolt Burning Hands, Scorching Ray, Fireball, Wall of Fire
Telekinetic Gain Expertise in Athletics or Acrobatics Mage Hand Jump, Levitate, Fly, Freedom of Movement
Turbulent Resist Poison Poison Spray Fog Cloud, Gust of Wind, Stinking Cloud, Vitriolic Sphere (XGE)

* Change the energy type and trappings of these spells to match the overall energy type of the mutation (e.g., Misty Step has you teleport on a line of electricity).

It is highly suggested that you pick a suite of mutations that point to a particular origin. For example:

  • Aberrant: Communicative, Dominant, Mesmeric, Turbulent
  • Celestial: Communicative, Constructive, Dimensional, Luminous
  • Draconic: Dominant, Immune, Telekinetic, (Cryokinetic, Electrokinetic, Entropic, Pyrokinetic, or Turbulent based on dragon color)
  • Elemental: Ceraunokinetic, Dimensional, Luminous (Constructive, Cryokinetic, Pyrokinetic, or Turbulent based on elemental type)
  • Fey: Constructive, Dimensional, Illusory, Mesmeric
  • Fiendish: Cryokinetic, Electrokinetic, Pyrokinetic, Turbulent
  • Undead: Dimensional, Entropic, Immune, Nightmarish

If your race or other source already grants you a resistance you’d gain from one of these mutation types, work with your DM to replace it with an appropriate expertise.

Hated and Feared

Starting at 3rd level, elements of your mystical heritage become readily apparent. Work with your DM to develop a particular mystical signature or physical stigma that calls attention to you in civilized lands. You have disadvantage on Charisma (Persuasion) checks to interact with the superstitious unless you go to great pains to hide your heritage, but you gain advantage on Charisma (Intimidation) checks against the same kind of individuals.

You may also add the following 1st-level spells to your personal spell list from which you can choose Spells Known. They are general magics that all mutants seem to have access to, in order to hide and protect themselves from a world that hates and fears them: Absorb Elements (XGE), Chaos Bolt (XGE), Disguise Self, Expeditious Retreat, False Life.

Latent Mutation

Starting at 9th level, you gain a fourth mutation. You immediately gain the cantrip and special ability of that mutation, and may add its spells to your personal spell list.

Emissary

At 13th level, your mutation has progressed to the point that your progenitors recognize you as one of them, and you also have standing among the mutant community. You have advantage on Charisma checks when dealing with other mutants, and when dealing with the creature type of your origin. Creature types of your origin will tend to treat you as a peer or relative rather than a threat upon first encounter.

Omega Class

At 17th level, you may use the Empowered Spell and Heightened Spell metamagic abilities of the Sorcerer class. You have sorcery points equal to your Charisma modifier, and you recover to full sorcery points upon taking a long rest.

D&D 5e: Alternate Ways to Be Angry

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This is the previously promised pair of writeups designed to take what I consider to be essential features of Barbarian and port them to becoming subclasses of the more-interesting-to-play Fighter and Ranger (though I’m told that one really should play the Unearthed Arcana ranger rather than the one in the PHB). The goal here was to pack some fairly strong features into the subclasses (which are not usually strong enough to carry another class’ core mechanic). So I’ve made some additional limitations for each to try to expand the “budget” of how awesome they can be.

The Berserker College

Warriors from many cultures and eras have often come to the realization that fury is a useful tool in a fight. Some hone their rage through cultural traditions, while others simply have anger-management issues and low impulse control. Either way, when their blood is up they start to land brutal hits and seem insensate to pain, but give up a great deal of finesse.

Berserker Features

Fighter Level Feature
3rd Frenzy
7th Reckless
10th Instincts
15th Relentless
18th Unstoppable

Frenzy

When you choose this archetype at 3rd level, you may enter a Frenzy by expending your Second Wind. Second Wind costs a bonus action normally, and you still make the same roll, but instead of regaining hit points, you gain a “frenzy counter” for each hit point you would have healed. While you have frenzy counters, you gain all the benefits and drawbacks of being in a frenzy.

You may:

  • Spend one frenzy counter at the beginning of your turn to maintain your frenzy. This cannot be performed if you are unconscious. If you cannot or will not spend a frenzy counter at this point, you leave frenzy.
  • Spend frenzy counters up to your proficiency bonus to add damage to a melee weapon attack after confirming it was successful. You can choose to add the amount of counters spent as a flat damage bonus, or instead choose to add a die to the roll with a maximum value equal to twice the counters spent (e.g., d12 for 6 spent counters).
  • Spend one frenzy counter to take half damage from a single source of Bludgeoning, Piercing, or Slashing damage.
  • Spend one frenzy counter to gain advantage on any Strength check or saving throw.
  • Spend one frenzy counter to gain advantage on any saving throw against Enchantment spells or against any effect that would cause you to become Charmed or Frightened on a failure.

Unless otherwise noted, spending frenzy counters does not require an action.

While in a frenzy:

  • Every time you miss an enemy with a melee attack roll, you gain an additional frenzy counter.
  • Every time you take damage from an enemy’s attack that you don’t spend a frenzy counter to reduce, you gain an additional frenzy counter.
  • Every time you fail a saving throw, you gain an additional frenzy counter.
  • If you are able to cast spells, you can’t cast them or concentrate on them.
  • You suffer disadvantage on ranged attack rolls.
  • You suffer disadvantage on Intelligence, Wisdom, and Charisma checks except for Intimidation.

If frenzy ends while you have frenzy counters remaining, you regain the use of your Second Wind. If you use Second Wind again before your next short or long rest (either for frenzy or for its normal use), instead of rolling, the result is automatically equal to half the frenzy counters you had remaining.

Reckless

Starting at 7th level, you can choose to attack recklessly before making any attacks on your turn. Doing so gives you advantage on all melee weapon attacks, but all attack rolls against you have advantage against you until your next turn.

Similarly, you may add a bonus die of a size up to twice your proficiency bonus (e.g., d12 at proficiency +6) to any Strength, Dexterity, or Constitution check, but lose hit points equal to the roll of the bonus die. This generally indicates that you hurt yourself excelling at the physical task.

Instincts

Starting at 10th level, you gain proficiency with Dexterity saving throws. You also gain advantage on initiative rolls.

Relentless

Starting at 15th level, while you are in a frenzy, if an attack would reduce you to 0 hit points, you are instead reduced to 1 hit point and any excess damage beyond that necessary to reduce you to 1 hit point is applied to your frenzy counters as if they were temporary hit points. If you are damaged sufficiently to remove all your frenzy counters and reduce you to 0 hit points, you begin dying normally.

Unstoppable

Starting at 18th level, while you are in a frenzy, you may spend a frenzy counter as a reaction when you would become Grappled, Paralyzed, Petrified, Prone, Restrained, or Stunned to not suffer that condition. Additionally, you may spend two frenzy counters as part of a move to double your base speed for the rest of your turn.

The Totem Conclave

While many rangers are quite happy to ally themselves with beasts and become a better team, some instead invite the very spirits of the beasts themselves to bond with them. These totem warriors can enter a state where they allow their civilized impulses to be subsumed by the instincts of their animal patron. Unlike lycanthropes or druids, they do not physically transform, but simply channel the strongest aspects of their totem through their mundane forms.

Totem Warrior Features

Ranger Level Feature
3rd Fury, Totem Spirit
5th Bestial Quickness
7th Aspect of the Beast
11th Fangs and Fur
15th Totemic Attunement

Fury

Starting at 3rd level, you spend a bonus action and expend a single spell slot to enter a state of fury. The level of spell slot expended gives you a totem die: the die size is equal to a d4 if you expended a 1st level spell slot, and increases a die size for each additional level of spell slot (to a maximum of d12 if you expended a 5th level slot).

While in this state:

  • The first time per turn that you hit a target with a weapon attack, it takes an additional totem die of damage from the weapon.
  • If you deal damage with a weapon attack, you gain temporary hit points equal to the roll of the totem die on your attack (including if it is doubled on a crit).
  • You may add the totem die to all Intelligence, Wisdom, or Charisma saving throws.
  • You have disadvantage on all Intelligence, Wisdom, and Charisma checks, except Insight, Perception, Survival, and Intimidation.
  • You can’t cast spells or concentrate on them.

This state ends when you become unconscious, take a short or long rest, or choose to take a bonus action to willingly end the state.

Totem Spirit

At 3rd level, when you adopt this conclave, you choose a totem spirit and gain its feature. Your totem spirit remains the same for all subsequent totem abilities gained at later levels. Example totems are below.

  • Totem of Strength (Wolf): While in fury, you have advantage on all Strength checks and saving throws. If you hit a target with a weapon attack while at least one ally is within 5 feet of it, it must make a Strength saving throw (DC equal to 8 + Your Proficiency Bonus + Your Strength Bonus) or fall prone.
  • Totem of Dexterity (Eagle): While in fury, you have advantage on all Dexterity checks and saving throws. Additionally, on any turn in which you move more than five feet, attackers have disadvantage on attacks against you until the beginning of your next turn (including attacks of opportunity for moving).
  • Totem of Constitution (Bear): While in fury, you have advantage on all Constitution checks and saving throws. You also have advantage on death saving throws you make if you were reduced to 0 hit points while in a fury. Additionally, you may use your reaction to gain resistance against any source of damage except Psychic after the damage amount is declared.

Bestial Quickness

At 5th level, while you are in a fury, you can attack twice, instead of once, whenever you take the Attack action on your turn. Your speed increases by 10 feet, even when you are not in a fury.

Aspect of the Beast

At 7th level, you gain a magical benefit based on the totem animal of your choice. Use the features for the Barbarian ability of the same name. (Wolf may overlap too much with default ranger abilities?)

Fangs and Fur

At 11th level, you fully embrace the fighting style of your totem, and gain benefits while unarmed or unarmored. When you are not wearing any armor, your AC is equal to the higher of 10 + your proficiency bonus or 13 + your Dexterity bonus. You can roll 1d8 in place of the normal damage of your unarmed strike, and you treat unarmed strikes as finesse weapons.

Totemic Attunement

At 15th level, you gain a magical benefit based on the totem animal of your choice. Use the features for the Barbarian ability of the same name (with “while raging” replaced with “while in a fury”).