D&D 5e: How Will You Rage?

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Colin recently posted a thorough examination of some of the flaws in the 5e barbarian. I agree with most of his points, and have several of my own that I plan to do a writeup on eventually (spoiler: your choices in character build and combat tactics are extremely limited and boring). Since I’ve built my feelings playing a barbarian in Brandes’ game (in which Colin also plays, so I’m one of the data points in his analysis), I’ve been discussing various options with them for how you could make different house rules to improve the class. This post is less about redesigning the barbarian, and more a very specific deep dive on the core issue: how do you build a rage mechanic, and how can you raise or lower its potency for balance concerns?

What Even Is Rage?

I assume there were various rages populated throughout AD&D, but the first major times I saw it was in the form of a power possessed by Minsc the ranger in Baldur’s Gate and in the Barbarian class as designed for 3e. Later iterations in 4e, Pathfinder, and 5e have kept various spins of the core elements of:

  • The state is triggered at will.
  • It only lasts a limited amount of time and is tiring.
  • You can’t really do things during it an angry person couldn’t do (i.e., cast spells or other actions that require concentration and intellect).
  • You get really strong and hit harder with things strong people hit harder with.
  • You get really tough and can take more punishment.
  • You’re more resistant to mental effects because your mind is so focused/unhinged.

Basically, it’s unabashedly modeling a less grandiose version of the Incredible Hulk, or the fears of what individuals are like when hopped up on amphetamines or otherwise having a violent mental episode (so modeling Bane). While that’s arguably not the most culturally appropriate thing (why are we glorifying uncontrollable rage and assuming that’s the hallmark of all tribal warriors?), you probably have to start from trying to keep them all if you’re looking at keeping something that’s inarguably a “rage” mechanic.

How Do You Time It?

The default expression of rage has been a fixed, short period effect which you get more uses of as you level, and which has a small but non-trivial action cost to activate on your turn. Pathfinder made the currency much more granular (a big pool of rounds rather than a small pool of larger blocks of time). Notably, the push seems to be to balance it against the expected number of fights in an adventuring day such that you can probably use it most of the time but not all of the time. Timers with a limited resource make this simple.

Another way to do it would be to tie it to a trigger that’s somewhat out of the PC’s control but is less resource-based: you rage until some ending trigger. Non-D&D games have been more inclined to make this trigger “everyone is dead, including maybe your friends.” This is more common in WoD games, and it’s probably not appropriate to most heroic D&D games to regularly start making the barbarian make hard checks to calm down before hurting people other than the bad guys. But it’s certainly worth considering that you can set triggers for when rage ends instead of a timer if you can find a trigger that makes sense for the setting you want to evoke.

You can also tie it to a resource other than actions and time. 5e‘s timer is already somewhat superfluous, since the rage ends if you stop attacking enemies or taking damage, and if you’re in a fight where you’ve still got enemies and HP after a minute, it’s kind of an unusually hard fight where it’s annoying your rage gives out anyway. The presence of people to attack/sources of damage is the resource involved. You could simplify it to a straight up damage over time effect: you end the rage on purpose whenever you’re tired of slowly bleeding HP.

My favorite rage mechanics from video games are ones that are additive in combat and decay over time. In City of Heroes, brutes gradually built up a fury meter from attacking and taking damage, and it diminished over time such that if you weren’t fighting, you were losing the cool fury abilities, so you were very inclined to risk rushing into the next fight unprepared rather than bleed off fury. World of Warcraft has a more sedate implementation for their warriors: unlike mana-using classes that start full of resources and gradually spend them through the fight faster than they can recover them, warriors start with little or no rage and get more from attacking and taking damage, and spend it on special abilities. Both of these approaches are tough in D&D lifted in a straightforward way, because you don’t usually experience a lot of combat rounds over the course of an adventuring day compared to an MMO. But I’m very enamored of the idea of rage being tied to a resource that starts small, bleeds off per round, but can be recovered faster than it bleeds by dealing and taking damage.

There’s also an outside chance that you could make the resource you’re using up just actions in your action economy. Depending on the utility of a bonus action for the class in question, it might make sense for rage to be something you can turn on or off at will, whenever you’re willing to burn actions on it. This might be a 1:1 (rage on rounds you spend an action, no rage on ones you don’t), or one action may get you multiple rounds of time/resource so your anger is like a fire you only have to stoke every so often. This is probably only worth investigating if the overall build has a big demand on bonus actions from all sides (e.g., presently, all it does is make using a two-handed weapon even more significantly better than two-weapon fighting).

Ultimately, rage in 5e is usable most of the time but not all of the time (unless you’re having fewer fights per day that still don’t go very long). Changing the timer to let you use it closer to all the time makes it a little more powerful, and making it so it’s available less often makes it a little less powerful. In my opinion, varying how you govern staying in rage is actually more about making the mechanic offer interesting choices and tradeoffs to the player.

How Do You Get Really Strong?

The traditional implementation of the strength boost was, well, a strength boost. In 3e and Baldur’s Gate, the increase to strength was meaningful, but increasingly less relevant at higher levels compared to other sources of damage bonus. 5e opted to just grant a couple of the derived effects of higher strength rather than forcing you to recalculate by granting advantage on strength checks and saves and a damage bonus to strength-based melee. The improvement to offense is really small, even compared to 3e (where at least strength improved your attack bonus, the extra damage could be stretched with two-handed weapons, and got multiplied on a crit).

5e‘s mechanisms for representing angry strength are pretty comprehensive, though. There are only so many ways to represent it in the system, and advantage on strength rolls and extra damage on strength attacks are most of them. You could theoretically give advantage on strength attacks, but that eats into a lot of other mechanics. Otherwise, I’m not sure how else you’d model “I’m even stronger right now.”

The amount and style of the damage bonus are your primary ways of raising or lowering the potency of this aspect of rage. There’s limited room to decrease the bonus, because it’s already +2 for much of your career, but you could switch it to something that’s not always available (e.g., if you’re using a resource-based rage, adding damage to an attack could be something that costs rage resources much like adding a superiority die for battlemasters). As Colin notes, it might feel better to switch it to a die instead of a flat add, even if you didn’t increase the average significantly, because that would at least get multiplied on a crit.

Instead of a damage bonus, you could also just give extra attacks, have some damage splash/cleave onto nearby targets, or make attacks do a certain amount of damage even on a miss.

Another option would be to increase the applicability of the strength. To wit, currently rage is a big help if you’re trying to force open doors or climb walls as part of a fight, but even if you wanted to blow a use out of combat the timing of it makes it difficult (e.g., if you’re climbing a cliff that will take more than a round, your rage will end because you’re not hurting someone or getting hurt). You could improve the utility of rage by coming up with some way to use it for out-of-combat strength checks. It’s probably a stretch to have it last long enough to meaningfully interact with encumbrance, though (“Grog… so angry… about carrying all this heavy treasure back to town. Still… just so angry.”).

How Do You Get Really Tough?

The traditional method of being really tough was just a fairly small pool of extra HP which might even go away at the end of the rage (so you really got no benefit from them at all unless you kept acting while you should be dead, then promptly died). 3e did this through a constitution boost, which also meant you were slightly better at concentration-based checks and saves. The 5e method is just to let you take half damage from most weapons (or from basically everything if you follow the bear totem), which made being tough the most significant aspect of rage.

It’s difficult to look at different strengths of resistance, since 5e has really made it on or off. You take full, half, or no damage from things. There isn’t a granular damage reduction like in 3e. If you wanted to keep resistance but scale it down, you could do like Colin suggested and make it start out only affecting one of the three weapon damage types. If you’re using a more granular resource model, you could make the player spend rage-maintaining resources to activate the resistance for a round or an attack (possibly using up your reaction as well).

Going back to a bonus HP model instead of resistance would provide more granularity. On the one hand, temporary HP aren’t usually typed in what they can be spent on, so they’re more versatile than weapon-damage-type resistance. On the other hand, they don’t stack, so a rage with resistance is more useful if you’re already getting temporary HP from other sources. There are basically two ways to award temporary HP: as a big, up-front pool, or as a smaller amount regenerated every round (like with the Heroism spell).

The big pool is likely to be better than resistance in most cases, except in fights where you almost died even with resistance (i.e., resistance can be thought of as a pool of temporary HP equal to how much damage you ultimately took, because you didn’t take half, so if you have less temporary HP than your total HP, there are some times it will be less good). But on fights where you didn’t get hit a lot, you might not even have exhausted the pool, where resistance means you always take at least some damage, because it only stops half.

Meanwhile, the smaller, regenerating pool is better if you’re taking a little damage every round (i.e., just enough temporary HP to soak it all up without touching your real HP). But it could be much worse against spike damage. A barbarian that gets missed three rounds in a row then takes 40 damage would much rather have resistance than 5 temporary HP per round, even though on average the math says he took 10 HP per round and mitigated half of it.

Where do you even start on the math involved? It’s obviously highly variable. How many monsters are attacking the barbarian each round, and how much damage do they do when they hit? How long could the barbarian sustain that? Without healing, the average raging barbarian can soak up around 20 HP per level before dropping (assuming 7 + 3 HP for most levels and halving the damage). If you do some rough assumptions that the barbarian on a busy and near-deadly day uses half her hit dice to heal plus gets some miscellaneous healing and has six encounters of at least three rounds each, you can assume a worst-case scenario is that she took as much as 40 damage per level over 20 rounds of fighting, for an average of 2 HP per level per round. As noted, this could be a very bad assumption if the damage actually comes in spikes rather than evenly distributed.

The DMG’s Monster Statistics by Challenge Rating chart paints a much spikier picture of the potential damage output from monsters. How much of the encounter’s monster budget will the barbarian have trying to hit her at any given moment? An 8th level barbarian tanking three characters’ worth of medium budget is facing 2,700 XP of monsters: is that one CR 7 dealing up to 50 damage on the average round it hits, or is that six CR 2s who are much less likely to all hit on the same round, but deal 120 points if they manage it? Either way, does the barbarian need significantly more than 16 HP (8th level x 2 HP) per round to get anywhere near the mitigation provided by straight resistance, or are spikes likely to be weird aberrations and a more conservative number is fine most of the time?

I’d want to playtest the hell out of it, but my gut says 3-4 temporary HP per level per round is likely to be as good or better than resistance under most circumstances. You might want to backstop it with some additional ways to emergency mitigate a spike from a crit or high-rolling spell, but barbarians already do have the best HP totals, so if a spike is so bad it ruins the barbarian’s day even without rage, it would have potentially killed anyone else in the party. The important thing is that if you go with temporary HP on this schedule, it’s pretty easy to reduce them to make rage’s toughness weaker and increase them to make it more powerful.

Finally, you could also show toughness by granting advantage on constitution-based saves, particularly against things like exhaustion and poison. But, like strength, these are more likely to come up when you aren’t in combat, so you’d have to have a way to stretch the effects of rage outside of a fight.

How Do You Model the Enraged Mind?

The biggest fear of the 5e barbarian is anything that requires an intelligence, wisdom, or charisma saving throw. In Baldur’s Gate, Minsc is outright immune to a lot of mind-affecting spells while berserk, and 3e barbarians at least got a small bonus to saves. In 5e, only one primal path gets anything near that benefit, and the tradeoff is that they become exhausted after their frenzy (and that exhaustion is way worse than the short fatigued state that hit 3e barbarians). Also, 5e barbarians can’t cast spells while raging or get any benefit to dexterity or ranged attacks, which prevents many nonstandard builds.

There’s a lot of system tweaking you can do to model what it means to be in a rage, that could make it more or less powerful, or more or less interesting.

Does the rage provide some kind of protection against mind-affecting spells, or do you want that to remain the barbarian’s kryptonite?

Is the rage controlled enough that you’ll allow it to benefit attacks other than strength melee and not lock out spellcasting, or do you like that they’re like bulls seeing red and can do little besides go beat on people? Do you want to balance it by making the barbarian’s tunnel vision even worse and limit her tactical options while in a rage (e.g., “you must attack the nearest enemy”)?

Is exhaustion/fatigue a reasonable cost to add to weaken rage/free up more “budget” to make other parts of it stronger? Is there something you can do to model that without relying on 5e‘s exhaustion track (which is a pretty major limit on how often you could rage, since it’s a short death spiral)?

Are there more interesting psychological aspects of how you want rage to work that suggest mechanics other than the aforementioned?

Putting It Into Practice

Continue through to a fighter college and ranger conclave that provide key barbarian elements in a more interesting class shell.

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D20: The Three-Raise Dice Pool

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The System

When calling for an important challenge that would normally be a single roll, instead have the player make three rolls. The first is at normal difficulty, the second is at a -5 penalty, and the third is at a -10 penalty. Count each successful roll for a results range of 0-3*, and use those for the result rather than a single roll’s margin of success.

* or 0-6, if you’re having critical results count double

The Design Reasoning

I sort of arbitrarily generated this dice mechanic for my Beyond the Wall game and have been using it ever since because it worked out so well. The initial inspiration for it was simply that the party’s extremely charismatic fighter was haggling with a succession of highly-skilled merchants. BtW is a roll-under system, so the PC was trying to roll under 21 (i.e., would be automatic except 20s always fail) and the merchants were trying to make targets in the high teens. Essentially, it was very likely that they’d both just succeed, and if I applied a penalty to a single roll the swing of the dice would still likely drown out the difference in skill.

I tend to find this to be a huge problem with contested challenges in D20 in general: when there are two rolls and you’re just going for a simple highest result, there’s a lot of space in the 400 results for the lower-skilled individual to win. There’s nothing quite like your master thief regularly failing stealth rolls against unskilled opposition because you rolled low and they rolled high.

So the system is primarily for contested checks, but also serves as a decent system for knowledge checks and other rolls where you’d normally expect the results to be presented in a tiered table (e.g., “If she rolls 10, she learns… If she rolls 15, she learns…”). Similar to contests, those types of checks can result in annoyance when highly skilled characters roll low. The math on the tiers are weird anyway: your skill total impacts the chance of learning the minimum result, but each higher result is just a 25% chance because of the flat results on a d20.

Ultimately, this system is doing two things:

  • It’s adding in some normalization and curving so the swinginess of a d20 doesn’t have an outsized effect on an important challenge. Three rolls will have a much higher chance of providing a more average spread of results, so a single good or bad roll at the wrong moment doesn’t overwhelm the character’s skill.
  • It’s putting in some raises to pull apart the difference between highly skilled and exceptional. It’s particularly meaningful in a roll-under system like BtW, where scores above 19 only matter if you’re suffering a penalty. But it can also matter to highly-skilled characters in a roll-over system, where a really high bonus isn’t that different from a decent bonus at low DCs.

Converting Pathfinder APs to 5e

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I’ve been reading through the Angry GM’s stuff, particular his megadungeon series, and couldn’t help but think about how his spreadsheets for encounters per level per dungeon section might line up with the various Pathfinder adventure paths. That led me down a thrilling couple of hours banging away at a giant spreadsheet of my own comparing the encounters in an AP to the various XP and wealth progressions. I’ll start off with the rules of thumb, and get into some wonkery explaining my work afterward.

Converting Modules

First off, the bad news: there’s no 1:1 enemy conversion available.

There’s no way that 5e, with one Monster Manual, Volo’s, and a few other sources could approach the mass of opponent options in (at current count) six bestiaries, bonus monsters in every AP volume, multiple guides with NPCs, and the ability to attach class levels and templates to things. But even if they could, the math of 5e is just different for encounters than Pathfinder. For example, Pathfinder considers 12 zombies a level 6 encounter, while 5e considers them a level 5 encounter (and awards XP like a level 3 encounter, because 5e adds a difficulty premium for lots of monsters taking actions).

So you’re going to have to basically rebuild every encounter in the AP with the closest equivalents (of existing monsters or ones you custom make) that meet a new XP target.

But at least the math for doing so is relatively straightforward, since the expected encounters per level in Pathfinder is not that far off from the expectation in 5e.

Most Pathfinder adventure path modules include a target CR at the start of every room or encounter, which may be made up of multiple enemies of lower CRs within the text itself. Simply rebuild the room as a medium encounter of that level. Remember to apply the correct multiplier for multiple opponents.

For treasure awards:

  • Convert most magic items to their cash value (possibly as art) or consumables.
  • Grant half of all of the cash (including that from converted items). For example, if the encounter has printed loot of 100 gp, 300 sp, and a 500 gp value item, it instead gives 50 gp, 150 sp, and a 250 gp value art object (or consumables).
  • Only the most interesting magic items get converted to 5e equivalents. For those, try to give them a value equal to half their Pathfinder value based on the rarity values on page 135 of the 5e DMG. For example, a +3 equivalent shield is worth around 9,000 gp in Pathfinder, so gets translated to a strong Rare item or a weak Very Rare item in 5e (which, in this instance, checks out).

Expected Equivalencies

While the XP awards keep 5e characters within spitting distance of Pathfinder characters, it’s not perfect. In particular, 5e‘s first two levels go by much faster than Pathfinder‘s, while fifth level lasts much longer.

You can expect that:

  • Player characters will hit 2nd level significantly sooner than the AP intends, and will hit 3rd level around the time the AP planned for them to hit 2nd level.
  • They’ll be around a level ahead at all times until the module expects them to hit 5th level.
  • At that point, it starts to swing a little bit, but the PCs will usually be a few encounters behind where the AP expects them to be until 12th level.
  • They hit 12th level at pretty close to the exact right spot, then are close to in sync for the next couple of levels.
  • They pull ahead at 15th, and will pull further and further ahead as time goes on, to the point of hitting 20th level when a Pathfinder character would be early in 18th level. For most APs this won’t matter much, but you might want to pull back encounter budgets further past 15th level (or feel more free to skip non-plot-critical encounters).

The Wonkery

I made a long sheet with every encounter from the Mummy’s Mask AP, with a running total of XP per party member (for a four member-party) and a level lookup to make sure that the awards tracked where the modules suggested they should be. They did, and were usually pretty damned precise (almost as if the APs are created by carving up each level as an XP budget for each section of each module…).

Initially, I looked at just handing out 2/3 of the Pathfinder budget for each encounter, and that tracked as well or better until 10th level, when the XP charts diverge too much. Converting the encounter’s CR from the module to an equivalent 5e encounter somewhere between Easy and Medium created the best correspondence with the easiest-to-remember and process rule of thumb. By just targeting Medium, but assuming that there will be an overall loss of XP because of the difficulty multiplier for multiple enemies, it should be easy to remember how to convert without having to do any averaging yourself.

For treasure, I did a much less thorough comparison, and just looked at the stated Pathfinder wealth by level compared to the expected cash equivalent 5e income derived in this thread. I noted the suggested starting magic items for higher-level characters on page 38 of the DMG, and assumed those were relatively close to what you’d be expected to find in play, adding their value to the cash totals (it winds up only counting for about 15%).

The comparison of Pathfinder to 5e wealth has a ton of swing in it, but it gets pretty close to 50% for the last two tiers. Functionally, for the first tier the PCs will find a lot more wealth than the DMG expects (since Pathfinder frontloads more treasure), but there shouldn’t be a big enough difference by 7th level to justify a more complicated method of recalculating the AP’s treasure. It’s already going to be annoying enough to look up the value of minor magic items to turn them into cash prizes. Since I didn’t look super deeply at how the APs award magic items, I imagine that figuring out what to convert to cash and what to replace with a 5e equivalent will be more art than science.

D&D 5e: Rested Dice

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This system evolved out of discussions with Brandes about Colin’s Planescape life support rules. It’s also heavily informed by the resting bonuses from Pillars of Eternity. Finally, it also owes some obvious inspiration to the classic PVP strip.

This system has four primary goals:

  • Make players be more hesitant to just take a long rest even when there’s no time pressure or when traveling overland (i.e., make situations where there’s only an encounter or two between long rests less common)
  • Give players something useful to spend excess cash on
  • Provide a supplement to the Inspiration system
  • Encourage PCs to take more downtime (instead of rocketing up in level over a few days of frenzied adventuring)

The prices are based on the idea of characters moving to the next larger die size every four levels or so (e.g., d8 at 9th-12th level). Dice larger than what’s intended for your current level should be something you’d have to save for, while dice at your level should cost around the average proceeds from a single encounter (meaning it ought to be fairly affordable to use an average of one Rested Die per short rest).

Earning Rested Dice

When player characters take a long rest in a safe location, if that location features additional amenities to provide relaxation and/or stress relief, the characters may spend money to accumulate Rested Dice. These dice represent mental and physical health and readiness beyond the on-the-road standard.

A “safe location” usually means an inn, permanent residence, or other location where there’s no need to set a watch and the character can sleep deeply without much worry of being harmed in her sleep. Amenities may include a wide range of entertainment opportunities relevant to that particular character’s interests (e.g., one PC may get the bonus from a night of carousing and then sleeping at a friendly flophouse, while another has a quiet evening being pampered at the best inn available).

Each character may accumulate one Rested Die per long rest, and the die earned is based on the amount of money spent (this includes fixed costs of lodgings and food):

  • d4 (20 gp)
  • d6 (60 gp)
  • d8 (250 gp)
  • d10 (1000 gp)
  • d12 (4000 gp)

Characters may only accumulate a maximum number of Rested Dice equal to level/hit dice at any one time. Larger dice can replace smaller dice once this maximum is reached (e.g., a 5th level character spends 20 gp each of the first three nights in town, then 60 gp each of the next three nights, ending with 2d4 and 3d6).

Taking downtime actions do not generally conflict with accumulating Rested Dice (i.e., you should be able to spend for a Rested Die every day of your downtime, if desired, unless the described method of relaxation would obviously conflict with the described downtime action).

Spending Rested Dice

A character can spend rested dice for four purposes:

  • Additional Hit Dice: One or more Rested Dice can be spent during a short rest to recover HP, exactly like hit dice (i.e., roll the Rested Die desired, add Con mod, and recover that many HP).
  • Spell Slot Recovery: One or more Rested Dice can be spent during a short rest to recover expended spell slots. This works similarly to the Arcane Recovery ability of Wizards. The character recovers a total number of expended spell slots equal to the result of the rolled die. Each die must be spent separately (e.g., rolling 2d4 to generate 2 and 3 does not allow the character to recover a 4th or 5th level slot). Unlike Arcane Recovery, the slots can be of any level the character has expended.
  • Rested Inspiration: Dice may be spent like Bardic Inspiration dice to add to the total of a roll after rolling but before the GM says whether the roll succeeds or fails. At the GM’s option, the rolls that these dice can be spent on may vary based on the source of the dice (e.g., places where you can spend your dice on attack rolls and death saves may be more valuable vacation spots than ones that just let you use them on ability checks). At the GM’s option, you can only roll one of these dice on any given roll, and they’re used instead of Bardic Inspiration (i.e., you cannot get an extremely high result by stacking Rested and Bardic Inspiration).
  • Long Rests in the Wilderness: At the GM’s option, a character must expend a Rested Die (of any size) to benefit from a long rest in any unsafe location (i.e., anywhere that’s not a safe location as described above). If not expended, sleeping for the night counts as a short rest.

Alternate/Supplementary System: Fortune Dice

In addition to or instead of granting Rested Dice via expending money to relax, you could also assign them as minor rewards for various actions for which you don’t want to grant XP or treasure. This can be especially useful as a way to reward optional encounters and quests when you’re using some form of milestone XP. If using them entirely as Fortune Dice, you may wish to increase the cap on the total number available, particularly at low level (since players are going to be more likely to hoard them when they are no longer in complete control of the next time they may get more, and you may want to give out more than one at a time).

5e Background: Occultist

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The world is full of magic, but there are gradations in its mysteries. Many of the supernatural creatures in the world require no special leap of understanding: they’re beasts with a touch of magic that makes them more dangerous, but still comprehensible in motives and means. Other beings, however, defy mortal intuition in their goals and capabilities. These immortal threats captivate the curiosity of those that know of them, inevitably inspiring organizations to assemble that seek to limit—or obtain—their power.

You may have been raised by members of such an occult lodge, or perhaps you stumbled across one and were taken in after your own brush with the inexplicable. They’ve taught you ways of dealing with these creatures… not safely, but perhaps more safely than otherwise. Moreover, they’ve given you a mandate to learn more about these creatures to add to the lodge’s archives. Information is a weapon, and understanding is a shield: you’ve seen too many of the blissfully ignorant devoured by creatures they could not comprehend.

Skill Proficiencies: Two chosen based on Fields of Study (below)
Languages: Two chosen based on Fields of Study (below)
Equipment: A holy symbol, a notebook with quill and ink, cryptic instructions and passphrases for making contact with friendly occultist lodges in other cities, a set of traveler’s clothes, and a belt pouch containing 10 gp

Fields of Study

Occultist lodges tend to specialize in a particular domain of the larger occult world. Roll or choose two areas that your lodge focuses upon from the options below, and take the skill and language listed for each.

  1. Aberrations (Arcana and Deep Speech)
  2. Celestials (Religion and Celestial)
  3. Demons (Religion and Abyssal)
  4. Devils (Arcana and Infernal)
  5. Dragons (History and Draconic)
  6. Elementals (Nature and Primordial)
  7. Fey (Nature and Sylvan)
  8. Undead (History and an ancient dead language)

Feature: Warding Techniques

Occultists have disseminated a wide array of simple rituals and materials useful in dealing with immortal threats.

You may cast Protection from Good and Evil as a ritual (even though it cannot normally be cast in this way) and automatically gain it as a known spell in any of your spellcasting classes.

You start with a case full of Occultist Supplies with a value of 25 gp, and may, during any downtime in a sufficiently large city to have obscure materials, pay to restock your case (up to a maximum value of 100 gp). Once you determine the nature of a supernatural threat you are facing, you can spend value from the case to immediately “purchase” supplies that the GM agrees are reasonable for you to have on hand against such an eventuality. For example, if you have a fully stocked case and encounter a demon, you might immediately withdraw two flasks of holy water from the case (leaving it with 50 gp worth of unspecified further materials).

Suggested Characteristics

d8 Personality Trait

  1. There is one type of immortal creature that I’m obsessed with academically, and won’t shut up about.
  2. I’m almost compulsive in my paranoia about supernatural threats, especially when it comes to trying to protect my sleeping spaces.
  3. I will not begin to trust a new acquaintance until subjecting that person to a battery of tests to reveal occult influence.
  4. I’m a bit of an occult groupie, actually, and love to adorn myself with clothing and jewelry that evokes my interests.
  5. My conspiracy theories about occult infiltration into all levels of government would annoy, if they didn’t sometimes wind up true.
  6. I’m very particular about my diet, avoiding dishes where I don’t know the cook, and always eating my own strange blend of spices that I believe makes me supernaturally unappetizing.
  7. Every time I explain the powers and weaknesses of a creature, that explanation comes with a story of the hard-won nature of this lore.
  8. I don’t believe in coincidences, and seek to work out how anything that looks like one is actually the machinations of the divine or immortal.

d6 Ideal

  1. Safety. The common folk should not fear the things that go bump in the night; I will protect them. (Good)
  2. Power. My study of the occult leads me to the most advantageous way of gaining immortality for myself. (Evil)
  3. Mortality. Mortal society deserves to make its own decisions free from the influence of immortal powers. (Lawful)
  4. Courage. Facing down the supernatural is the greatest way to prove your own freedom from fear. (Chaotic)
  5. Knowledge. The morality of the immortal is not as important as cataloging it for future study. (Neutral)
  6. Tradition. In a very real way, these immortal beings would have no meaning without the occultists that watch and chronicle them. (Any)

d6 Bond

  1. A particularly powerful creature killed my mentor, and I’m learning all I can to eventually end its existence.
  2. A family member went missing in a supernatural attack, and I’ll eventually track them down, though I fear I won’t like what I find.
  3. I’ve been ground down by doing this for what seems like my whole life, and I need to have a big success to prove that I can actually make an impact in a world of immortal monsters.
  4. I’m tracking a lost tome that should have many secrets valuable to my lodge and my journey.
  5. I’m worried that my lodge’s leadership has been suborned by the occult, and am seeking a way to reveal and deal with this threat.
  6. I was the sole survivor of a monster attack, and I’m trying to find out whether there’s some reason I survived… or that they left me alive.

d6 Flaw

  1. There’s a type of creature that I study that would absolutely terrify me were I to encounter it in person.
  2. I’m too secure in my own rituals and preparations, and tend to underrate threats to my own person.
  3. If an immortal creature is willing to talk, so am I, even if that gives it time to learn my weaknesses.
  4. I will never fully trust anyone until they’ve died helping me… and even then, I’ll want to burn the body.
  5. I over-plan because I’m actually a bit of a coward about facing down creatures I don’t feel fully prepared for.
  6. I think people that bargain with or otherwise gain power from occult sources are fools to think that power isn’t corrupting, and have a hard time containing my contempt.

D&D 5e: Wizard School Courses

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A friend suggested he was working on a Harry Potter-style D&D game, with the premise that each level 1-7 was a year of school (not unlike my own previous suggestion to start PCs at higher level). That got me thinking about how to set up a system for taking classes (the most thrilling challenge for any adventurer, I’m sure).

This is primarily meant for a game as described, where the first few levels are reframed as apprenticeship at a Wizard-only school, you level at the end of every school year, and academics feature heavily. But you could also use it in more standard games as a new downtime action for PC Wizards in a location with Wizards interested in training others (customizing for this is discussed more later).

The Coursework

Each course features four Wizard spells. Successful demonstration of each spell from the course is required at finals to get a top mark for the course (with progressively worse marks for being able to demonstrate fewer of the spells). Roughly at the 1/4, 1/2, 3/4, and finals sections of the course, you can make an ability check to learn a spell in the course’s sequence (it’s up to the GM whether they have to be learned in course order, with the more valuable spells later in the list, or whether the player can pick the order).

If you start already knowing one or more spells from the sequence, you obviously have more chances to learn the spells you don’t know yet (Hermione Granger carefully arranges her starting spells and free +2 spells per year to always go into new courses with at least one spell already known). At the GM’s option, each course might feature a related extra credit spell that you can get if you learn all four spells and still have a skill check left. Extra credit spells are likely to be spells from non-core books that you want to keep pretty rare but do want your PCs to have an opportunity to learn. For example, Hermione is taking Introductory Abjuration and already learned Mage Armor and Shield as part of her starting loadout (from reading all the books the summer before). She has four chances to learn the remaining two spells, and if she learns them with checks left over, she might have a shot at learning Snare as extra credit.

The difficulty of these checks should probably be 10+Spell Level, unless you want low grades to be more common.

The abilities and skills involved should be somewhat idiosyncratic and based on the teaching style of whatever instructor is teaching the course. Arcana should be the default, the other Int-based skills available to all Wizards (History, Investigation, and Religion) should also be very common. Other proficient or Int-based skills (Insight, Medicine, and Nature) should come up occasionally. The rest of the skills should only come up if you genuinely believe the player will be more amused than annoyed (likely as a joke that everyone winds up with one really hard course in their loads each semester, such as Basics of Motion being a PE course that uses Athletics).

So, for example, a first-year course catalog might look like:

  • Knowing Your Role:
    • Diviner Aleric provides a practical symposium on the basic spells that may be expected of the party’s Wizard.
    • (Arcana; Detect Magic (1), Alarm (1), Feather Fall (1), Sleep (1))
  • Making Friends and Influencing People:
    • Enchantress Bethany gives new students a crash course on social skills and their magical application.
    • (Insight; Unseen Servant (1), Comprehend Languages (1), Charm Person (1), Tasha’s Hideous Laughter (1))
  • Introductory Divination:
    • Diviner Aleric provides instruction on the most basic of divination arts for the beginner.
    • (Arcana: Detect Magic (1), Identify (1), Comprehend Languages (1), Find Familiar (1))
  • Introductory Abjuration:
    • Abjurer Clio leads a symposium on how abjuration interacts with priestly magics, and which is stronger.
    • (Religion: Mage Armor (1), Protection from Evil and Good (1), Shield (1), False Life (1))
  • Basic Skullduggery:
    • Daveth the Trickster introduces students to the most common tricks of the underhanded, how to spot them, and how to use them.
    • (Investigation: Expeditious Retreat (1), Illusory Script (1), Charm Person (1), Disguise Self (1))
  • Introduction to Combat Magic:
    • Evoker Elisha will expect you to come prepared to manifest your will in the form of eldritch might!
    • (Arcana: Witch Bolt (1), Magic Missile (1), Chromatic Orb (1), Burning Hands (1))
  • Introduction to Area Effects:
    • Conjurer Franklin will introduce you to the great and storied history of magics that affect an area.
    • (History: Fog Cloud (1), Color Spray (1), Burning Hands (1), Thunderwave (1))
  • Basics of Motion:
    • Dame Gretal expects all students for this course to be in trousers instead of robes and warmed up before class begins.
    • (Athletics: Expeditious Retreat (1), Jump (1), Feather Fall (1), Longstrider (1))
  • Introductory Conjuration:
    • Conjurer Franklin explains the grand history of conjuration, with a particular focus on the life of Tenser.
    • (History: Unseen Servant (1), Tenser’s Floating Disk (1), Grease (1), Fog Cloud (1))
  • Applied Attack and Defense:
    • Evoker Elisha suggests that you take at least one of her classes! You will need them or they will laugh at you!
    • (Arcana: Detect Magic (1), Magic Missile (1), Shield (1), False Life (1))
  • Avoiding Combat:
    • Transmuter Harlowe demonstrates the bodily trauma involved in adventuring, why you should avoid it, and several mechanisms for doing so.
    • (Medicine: Silent Image (1), Fog Cloud (1), Disguise Self (1), Sleep (1))
  • You are Not a Bard:
    • Troubadour Isabel is willing to cross-train those interested in the shared arts, and learn how Bardic magic differs.
    • (Performance: Silent Image (1), Charm Person (1), Longstrider (1), Tasha’s Hideous Laughter (1))
  • You are Not a Druid:
    • Jarek Moonblood will cross-train those interested in the intersection of Druidic and Wizardly magics.
    • (Nature: Detect Magic (1), Jump (1), Longstrider (1), Thunderwave (1))
  • You are Not a Warlock:
    • Kelline Winterbound believes that, if you can find her, she might tell you secrets that are useful to you. But there will be a price.
    • (Investigation: Illusory Script (1), Protection from Evil and Good (1), Comprehend Languages (1), Witch Bolt (1))
  • Introduction to Battlefield Control:
    • Abjurer Clio would like you to reflect on your dominance of the battlefield is like unto godliness.
    • (Religion: Ray of Sickness (1), Chromatic Orb (1), Color Spray (1), Thunderwave (1))

If you’re paying for the courses (either as part of fees for a school game, or for the downtime action in a regular game), the cost of the course should be around 25-50% less than scribing the spells individually (to compensate for chance of failure, increased time, and getting spells you might not want). School specialization should result in gaining Advantage on the roll to learn a spell, rather than half cost.

In a downtime action, the time spent should obviously be highly compressed, though still longer than just scribing the spells individually.

For a school game, each one obviously takes all semester, and maybe a whole year (depending on how many spells you want PCs to know). You should probably also have the skill checks spaced out between multiple courses, rather than rolling for every course in the load at the 25% sections; that way, you get a steady progression throughout the year when you’re not otherwise gaining levels.

Additional Suggested Courses Through 4th Level

Note that the distribution of spells is based on rarity across class lists. Spells that are Wizard-only only appear once in the courses, if they’re on 1-2 other class lists they appear twice, if they’re on 3-5 other lists they appear three times, and if they’re on 6+ other lists they appear four times.

  • Living Your Role: Mage Armor (1), Magic Weapon (2), Scorching Ray (2), Invisibility (2)
  • Surviving the Fight: Protection from Evil and Good (1), Blur (2), Spider Climb (2), Rope Trick (2)
  • Practical Divination: Identify (1), Darkvision (2), Locate Object (2), Detect Thoughts (2)
  • Introduction to Sanctums: Alarm (1), Continual Flame (2), Magic Mouth (2), Arcane Lock (2)
  • Practical Motion: Jump (1), Gust of Wind (2), Levitate (2), Shatter (2)
  • Practical Battlefield Control: Ray of Sickness (1), Blindness/Deafness (2), Crown of Madness (2), Hold Person (2)
  • The Cutting Edge of Arcana: Phantasmal Force (2), Cloud of Daggers (2), Crown of Madness (2), Misty Step (2)
  • Practical Skullduggery: Darkness (2), Alter Self (2), Invisibility (2), Knock (2)
  • Four Types of Pain: Scorching Ray (2), Cloud of Daggers (2), Melf’s Acid Arrow (2), Shatter (2)
  • Practical Illusion: Blur (2), Mirror Image (2), Invisibility (2), Blindness/Deafness (2)
  • Becoming the Primary Target: Ray of Enfeeblement (2), Flaming Sphere (2), Phantasmal Force (2), Suggestion (2)
  • You are Not a Cleric: Gentle Repose (2), Blindness/Deafness (2), Hold Person (2), Locate Object (2)
  • Of Light and Darkness: Darkvision (2), See Invisibility (2), Continual Flame (2), Darkness (2)
  • Practical Transmutation: Alter Self (2), Enlarge/Reduce (2), Magic Weapon (2), Knock (2)
  • Whispers of the Spider Queen: Darkvision (2), Spider Climb (2), Web (2), Suggestion (2)
  • Noun Preposition Noun: Cloud of Daggers (2), Crown of Madness (2), Glyph of Warding (3), Protection from Energy (3)
  • Disciple’s Enchantment: Detect Thoughts (2), Suggestion (2), Fear (3), Hypnotic Pattern (3)
  • Disciple’s Area Effects: Flaming Sphere (2), Shatter (2), Lightning Bolt (3), Fireball (3)
  • Disciple’s Control: Web (2), Hold Person (2), Slow (3), Stinking Cloud (3)
  • Four Weird Tricks: Magic Mouth (2), Blink (3), Major Image (3), Hypnotic Pattern (3)
  • Disciple’s Divination: See Invisibility (2), Locate Object (2), Tongues (3), Clairvoyance (3)
  • Air Magics: Gust of Wind (2), Gaseous Form (3), Sleet Storm (3), Fly (3)
  • Strength and Weakness: Enlarge/Reduce (2), Ray of Enfeeblement (2), Remove Curse (3), Bestow Curse (3)
  • Disciple’s Necromancy: Gentle Repose (2), Feign Death (3), Vampiric Touch (3), Animate Dead (3)
  • Disciple’s Motion: Levitate (2), Slow (3), Haste (3), Fly (3)
  • Disciple’s Illusion: Mirror Image (2), Nystul’s Magic Aura (2), Nondetection (3), Major Image (3)
  • Nope!: Misty Step (2), Dispel Magic (3), Remove Curse (3), Counterspell (3)
  • In Your Face!: Water Breathing (3), Stinking Cloud (3), Tongues (3), Sending (3)
  • Disciple’s Defenses: Dispel Magic (3), Magic Circle (3), Protection from Energy (3), Leomund’s Tiny Hut (3)
  • Special Topics: Scry and Fry: Nondetection (3), Clairvoyance (3), Fireball (3), Haste (3)
  • Disciple’s Abjuration: Magic Circle (3), Glyph of Warding (3), Remove Curse (3), Protection from Energy (3)
  • Special Topics: Verb Nouns: Dispel Magic (3), Bestow Curse (3), Feign Death (3), Animate Dead (3)
  • Special Topics: Adjective Nouns: Phantom Steed (3), Gaseous Form (3), Hypnotic Pattern (3), Vampiric Touch (3)
  • Special Topics: Single-Word Names: Fear (3), Blink (3), Sending (3), Tongues (3)
  • Finding Things and Getting There: Clairvoyance (3), Locate Creature (4), Dimension Door (4), Arcane Eye (4)
  • Adept’s Abjuration: Magic Circle (3), Counterspell (3), Banishment (4), Mordenkainen’s Private Sanctum (4)
  • Four Bad Things Done Well: Fear (3), Confusion (4), Blight (4), Banishment (4)
  • Adept’s Transmutation: Water Breathing (3), Polymorph (4), Stoneskin (4), Control Water (4)
  • Special Topics: Faking Your Own Death: Feign Death (3), Water Breathing (3), Dimension Door (4), Polymorph (4)
  • Direct vs. Secondhand Violence: Lightning Bolt (3), Blight (4), Locate Creature (4), Conjure Minor Elementals (4)
  • Adept’s Illusion: Major Image (3), Hallucinatory Terrain (4), Greater Invisibility (4), Phantasmal Killer (4)
  • Fire and Ice: Sleet Storm (3), Ice Storm (4), Wall of Fire (4), Fire Shield (4)
  • Stone Magics: Fabricate (4), Stone Shape (4), Stoneskin (4), Conjure Minor Elementals (4)
  • Special Topics: Terrain Control: Leomund’s Tiny Hut (3), Ice Storm (4), Hallucinatory Terrain (4), Wall of Fire (4)
  • The History of Four Great Wizards: Mordenkainen’s Faithful Hound (4), Otiluke’s Resilient Sphere (4), Leomund’s Secret Chest (4), Evard’s Black Tentacles (4)
  • Putting Your Enemies Off Balance: Dispel Magic (3), Hallucinatory Terrain (4), Polymorph (4), Confusion (4)

D&D 5e Scaling Spells, 4th-8th

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Continued from last week, here are the rest of the spells cast at higher level. As with the previous set, arguments about my choices are welcome in the comments.

Level 4 Spells

  • Arcane Eye: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 5th level or higher, the eye can move an additional 10 feet per action for each slot level above 4th.
  • Black Tentacles: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 5th level or higher, the damage dealt by the tentacles increases by 1d6 for each slot level above 4th.
  • Compulsion: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 5th level or higher, the range of the spell increases by 10 feet for each slot level above 4th.
  • Control Water: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 5th level or higher, the duration of the spell increases by 10 minutes for each slot level above 4th.
  • Death Ward: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 5th level or higher, you can target one additional creature for each slot level above 4th.
  • Dimension Door: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 5th level or higher, you can transport one additional passenger (who must also be within 5 feet of you) for each slot level above 4th.
  • Fabricate: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 5th level or higher, you can add four additional 5-foot cubes worth of space to the final large object for each slot level above 4th. Additionally, if you cast this spell with a slot of 6th level or higher you can include stone in the construction of a large object, and if you cast it with a slot of 8th level or higher you can include metal in the construction of a large object.
  • Faithful Hound: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 5th level or higher, the duration of the spell increases by 4 hours and the damage dealt by the hound increases by 1d8 for each slot level above 4th.
  • Fire Shield: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 5th level or higher, the duration of the spell increases by 10 minutes for each slot level above 4th.
  • Freedom of Movement: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 5th level or higher, you can target one additional creature for each slot level above 4th.
  • Giant Insect: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 5th level or higher, the creatures transformed by this spell gain temporary hit points. Divide 20 hit points for each slot level above 4th as evenly as possible among the transformed creatures.
  • Greater Invisibility: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 5th level or higher, you can target one additional creature for each slot level above 4th.
  • Guardian of Faith: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 5th level or higher, the damage dealt by the guardian increases by 10 for each slot level above 4th. Additionally, the damage dealt before the guardian vanishes increases by 30 for each slot level above 4th.
  • Hallucinatory Terrain: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 5th level or higher, the area of the spell increases by 50 feet on each side of the cube for each slot level above 4th.
  • Locate Creature: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 5th level or higher, the duration of the spell increases by 1 hour for each slot level above 4th.
  • Polymorph: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 5th level or higher, you can target one additional creature for each slot level above 4th.
  • Resilient Sphere: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 5th level or higher, the range of the spell increases by 30 feet for each slot level above 4th.
  • Secret Chest: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 5th level or higher, for the duration of the spell the chest’s interior dimensions increase beyond its physical size, allowing it to store more material. The space available for storage increases by 6 cubic feet for each slot level above 4th. If the spell ends while more is stored within the chest than should be physically possible, the excess contents disgorge themselves into the space around the chest.
  • Stone Shape: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 5th level or higher, you can shape one additional 5 foot cube of stone for each slot level above 4th.
  • Stoneskin: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 5th level or higher, you can target one additional creature for each slot level above 4th. The material component cost of the spell increases proportionately to the number of creatures affected.

Level 5 Spells

  • Antilife Shell: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 6th level or higher, the duration of the spell increases by 1 hour for each slot level above 5th.
  • Awaken: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 6th level or higher, the casting time of the spell decreases by 2 hours for each slot level above 5th (to a minimum of 1 action at 9th level).
  • Contagion: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 6th level or higher, you may target an additional creature for each slot level above 5th. You gain a number of rounds equal to the number of targets in which you may use your action to touch an additional creature in melee range to become affected by the spell.
  • Dispel Evil and Good: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 6th level or higher, you may gain an additional use of the spell’s special functions for each slot level above 5th without ending the spell early.
  • Dream: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 6th level or higher, the damage of the nightmare version of the spell increases by 2d6 for each slot level above 5th.
  • Greater Restoration: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 6th level or higher, an additional effect or exhausted level can be removed for each slot level above 5th. The material component cost of the spell increases proportionately to the number of additional effects or exhausted levels removed.
  • Hallow: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 6th level or higher, the casting time of the spell decreases by 6 hours for each slot level above 5th (to a minimum of 1 action at 9th level).
  • Legend Lore: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 6th level or higher, the casting time of the spell decreases by two and a half minutes for each slot level above 5th (to a minimum of 1 action at 9th level).
  • Mislead: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 6th level or higher, the duration of the spell increases by 30 minutes for each slot level above 5th. Additionally, if cast using a slot of 9th level, the invisibility counts as Greater Invisibility, so is not ended if you attack or cast a spell.
  • Passwall: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 6th level or higher, the duration of the spell increases by 1 hour for each slot level above 5th. Instead, you may choose to leave the duration unaffected and increase the maximum depth of the opening by 10 feet for each slot level above 5th.
  • Raise Dead: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 6th level or higher, the casting time of the spell decreases by 15 minutes for each slot level above 5th (to a minimum of 1 action at 9th level).
  • Reincarnate: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 6th level or higher, the casting time of the spell decreases by 15 minutes for each slot level above 5th (to a minimum of 1 action at 9th level).
  • Scrying: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 6th level or higher, the duration of the spell increases by 30 minutes for each slot level above 5th.
  • Seeming: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 6th level or higher, the duration of the spell increases by 4 hours for each slot level above 5th.
  • Telekinesis: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 6th level or higher, the range of the spell increases by 30 feet for each slot level above 5th.
  • Telepathic Bond: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 6th level or higher, the duration of the spell increases by 30 minutes for each slot level above 5th.
  • Teleportation Circle: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 6th level or higher, the duration of the spell increases by 1 round for each slot level above 5th (you may voluntarily close it early if desired, from either side of the portal). Additionally, the casting time of the spell decreases to 1 minute with a 6th level slot, to 6 rounds with a 7th level slot, to 3 rounds with an 8th level slot, and to 1 action with a 9th level slot.
  • Tree Stride: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 6th level or higher, the range of the spell increases for each slot level above 5th. At 6th level, the range becomes 1 mile, at 7th level it becomes 20 miles, at 8th level it becomes 100 miles, and at 9th level it becomes unlimited within the same plane or world. Instead of knowing the location of all trees within the extended range, you know the location of all trees of the same kind within 500 feet of your intended destination (and cannot complete the round of travel if you chose a location that was not within 500 feet of a tree of the same kind).
  • Wall of Force: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 6th level or higher, the duration of the spell increases by 5 minutes for each slot level above 5th. Additionally, if cast using a spell slot of 8th level or higher, the spell no longer requires Concentration (buy you may still end it early if desired).
  • Wall of Stone: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 6th level or higher, the number of panels created by the spell increases by 5 panels for each slot level above 5th.

Level 6 Spells

  • Blade Barrier: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 7th level or higher, the damage dealt to creatures in the wall’s area increases by 1d10 for each slot level above 6th.
  • Contingency: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 7th level or higher, the duration of the spell increases by 5 days for each slot level above 6th.
  • Eyebite: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 7th level or higher, targets that fail a saving throw against the spell also take 1d10 necrotic damage for each slot level above 6th.
  • Find the Path: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 7th level or higher, the duration of the spell increases by 12 hours for each slot level above 6th. Additionally, if you cast this spell using a spell slot of 8th level or higher, it no longer requires concentration.
  • Flesh to Stone: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 7th level or higher, you can target one additional creature for each slot level above 6th.
  • Forbiddance: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 7th level or higher, the number of days required before the effect becomes Until Dispelled decreases by 1 for each slot level above 6th (e.g., it only requires 10 days of casting this at 9th level before it becomes effectively permanent).
  • Guards and Wards: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 7th level or higher, the number of days required before the effect becomes Until Dispelled decreases by 4 for each slot level above 6th (e.g., it only requires one month of casting this at 9th level before it becomes effectively permanent).
  • Harm: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 7th level or higher, the damage dealt by the spell increases by 3d6 for each slot level above 6th.
  • Heroes’ Feast: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 7th level or higher, the number of creatures that can partake of the feast increases by 6 for each slot level above 6th.
  • Irresistible Dance: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 7th level or higher, you can target one additional creature for each slot level above 6th.
  • Magic Jar: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 7th level or higher, if the spell expires in a way that would cause you to die while possessing a body, there is a chance that you instead permanently take over the possessed body (causing the soul of the body to die in your stead). This chance is equal to 25% for each slot level above 6th.
  • Move Earth: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 7th level or higher, the duration of the spell increases by 1 hour for each slot level above 6th.
  • Planar Ally: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 7th level or higher, the casting time of the spell decreases to 1 minute with a 7th level slot, to 4 rounds with an 8th level slot, and to 1 action with a 9th level slot.
  • Programmed Image: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 7th level or higher, the performance duration increases by 2 minutes for each slot level above 6th.
  • Sunbeam: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 7th level or higher, the damage dealt by the spell increases by 1d8 for each slot level above 6th.
  • Transport via Plants: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 7th level or higher, the duration of the spell increases by 1 round for each slot level above 6th (you may voluntarily close it early if desired, from either side of the transportation).
  • True Seeing: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 7th level or higher, the duration of the spell increases by 1 hour for each slot level above 6th.
  • Wind Walk: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 7th level or higher, the flying speed granted by the spell increases by 100 feet for each slot level above 6th.
  • Word of Recall: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 7th level or higher, you can target three additional creatures for each slot level above 6th.

Level 7 Spells

  • Arcane Sword: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 8th level or higher, the sword can move 40 feet instead of 20. When you cast it using a spell slot of 9th level, all the sword’s attacks gain Advantage.
  • Divine Word: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 8th level or higher, each of the current hit point limits on the spell’s chart increases by 10 hit points for each slot level above 7th (e.g., at 9th level creatures with 70 hit points or fewer can be Deafened down to creatures with 40 hit points or fewer can be killed instantly).
  • Finger of Death: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 8th level or higher, the damage dealt by the spell increases by 2d8 for each slot level above 7th.
  • Fire Storm: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 8th level or higher, the damage dealt by the spell increases by 1d10 for each slot level above 7th.
  • Forcecage: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 8th level or higher, the duration of the spell increases by 1 hour for each slot level above 7th.
  • Magnificent Mansion: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 8th level or higher, the duration of the spell increases by 24 hours for each slot level above 7th.
  • Mirage Arcane: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 8th level, the casting time of the spell becomes 1 minute. When you cast it using a spell slot of 9th level, the casting time becomes 1 action.
  • Plane Shift: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 8th level or higher, the number of creatures that can be transported increases by 4 for each slot level above 7th.
  • Prismatic Spray: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 8th level, the damage dice used by the damaging rays become d8s. When you cast it using a spell slot of 9th level, the damage dice become d10s.
  • Project Image: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 8th level or higher, Intelligence (Investigation) checks to reveal the illusion gain Disadvantage. When you cast it using a spell slot of 9th level, it no longer requires Concentration (though you can still end it whenever desired).
  • Regenerate: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 8th level or higher, the initial hit points healed increase by 4d8 for each slot level above 7th.
  • Resurrection: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 8th level or higher, it automatically destroys and then resurrects a touched mindless, corporeal undead. When you cast it using a spell slot of 9th level, it destroys and resurrects a touched intelligent, corporeal undead if the target fails a Charisma saving throw (the target can choose to fail this saving throw automatically).
  • Reverse Gravity: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 8th level or higher, you can exclude four targets (creatures or objects) from the effect for each slot level above 7th. These targets do not have to start within the area or remain in it to preserve this exclusion.
  • Sequester: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 8th level or higher, you can target one additional creature or object for each slot level above 7th. All targets to be affected must be in physical contact at the casting of the spell.
  • Simulacrum: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 8th level or higher, the casting time decreases by 6 hours for each slot level above 7th (to a minimum of 1 action at 9th level).
  • Symbol: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 8th level or higher, the casting time decreases by 5 rounds for each slot level above 7th (to a minimum of 1 action at 9th level).
  • Teleport: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 8th level or higher, the number of creatures that can be transported increases by 4 for each slot level above 7th.

Level 8 Spells

  • Animal Shapes: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 9th level, the targets no longer have to be willing. Unwilling targets receive a Charisma saving throw to avoid the transformation.
  • Antimagic Field: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 9th level, you can anchor the area on a specific point in space rather than on yourself, and it no longer requires Concentration to maintain. At the DM’s option, regular use of this spell on the same area over time may result in an effectively permanent antimagic zone.
  • Antipathy (Sympathy): When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 9th level, the casting time becomes 1 action but the duration is reduced to 1 minute.
  • Clone: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 9th level, the time to reach maturity decreases to 90 days.
  • Control Weather: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 9th level, the time for new conditions to take effect decreases to 1d4 x 5 minutes, and the duration increases to Concentration up to 12 hours.
  • Demiplane: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 9th level, the created door to the demiplane is also affected by Arcane Lock as if cast with a 9th level spell slot.
  • Earthquake: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 9th level, you can designate up to 6 creatures that automatically succeed at all saving throws related to the spell.
  • Feeblemind: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 9th level, the target gains Disadvantage on the saving throw.
  • Glibness: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 9th level, you may cast this on a touched willing target instead of yourself.
  • Holy Aura: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 9th level, attackers have Disadvantage on the Constitution saving throw to avoid being Blinded.
  • Incendiary Cloud: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 9th level, the damage dice of the spell are d10s.
  • Maze: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 9th level, the target has Disadvantage on the Intelligence check to escape the maze.
  • Mind Blank: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 9th level, you can affect an additional target with the same casting.
  • Power Word Stun: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 9th level, the spell can affect a target of 200 hit points or fewer.
  • Sunburst: When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 9th level, the damage dice of the spell are d8s.

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