Long-Term Events

Advancement

As in character generation, increasing abilities by +1 with XP costs New Level x 5 (for most abilities) or New Level (for arts). You are usually allowed to buy multiple levels in a single season.

You are usually expected to devote XP to an ability at the end of the season, even if you do not have enough to increase the level of the ability. XP is essentially banked into the ability until the total equals or exceeds the amount necessary for the next level. Having any XP in a trained-only ability with a level of 0 is sufficient to attempt a roll.

In general, XP is awarded per season, based on what you were doing:

  • If you had an adventure that season, you usually gain Adventure XP.
  • If you were working on another project/job, you usually gain Exposure XP.
  • If you devote the whole season to advancement, you can gain XP from Practice, Training, Teaching, or studying from Books or Vis.

XP granted is the “Source Quality,” which may be modified by relevant Virtues and Flaws for that type of activity.

Going on an Adventure

Even if going on an adventure doesn’t take the whole season, there’s generally no time for any other type of activity or study in the season: you use the rest of the season consolidating what you learned from the adventure.

Adventures typically award 5-10 XP, which must generally be spent on abilities that were used “on stage” (i.e., you rolled them during the adventure). Exceptions can exist for abilities that would have been relevant during a narrated scene but were never actually rolled, but arts are generally only able to be raised if you actively used them.

Only up to 5 adventure XP can be put into any single ability for the season (so an award of 6+ XP must be divided among multiple abilities).

Some unexpected game events may not count as an Adventure (or the amount of Adventure XP would be less than you should receive from the planned activity). In that case, if the distraction removes you from your study for a month or more, reduce the XP earned by ⅓ (rounded up) per month not spent on your main area of study. For example, if you were expecting to earn 15 XP from Teaching and had an adventure that season that would award 5 adventure XP, you may prefer to take the teaching XP if the adventure took less than two months.

Gaining Exposure

If you did something other than one of the listed XP types in this section (e.g., lab work, training/teaching someone else, working a job, writing a book, etc.), you typically gain 2 XP, which can be put into one or two abilities relevant to the type of activity you were doing.

Practicing

When spending a season practicing without aid from others or access to books/vis, you typically gain 4 XP. This might be modified down to 3 or up to as much as 8 for certain types of practice (e.g., full-immersion language learning, exploring to learn Area Lore, etc.) as described on page 164.

You cannot increase arts with practice.

Receiving Training

You can assist someone who is using an ability to earn a living and gain Training XP (while the trainer gains Exposure XP but also earns a living). You do not earn a living or produce anything useful yourself while being trained.

The master must have a minimum level of 2 in the ability being trained, and you gain the master’s level + 3 XP (i.e., 5+ XP). You cannot gain any XP toward a level higher than the master’s level from training.

You cannot increase arts with training.

Receiving Teaching

If a master devotes a season to teaching you directly (rather than training you while working a job), you gain teaching XP. The teacher must have 2 in an ability or 5 in an art to teach it, you must share a common language, and you cannot gain XP toward a level higher than the teacher’s level in the ability being learned. The teacher gains Exposure XP.

You gain XP equal to the Teacher’s Communication + Teaching + 3 (plus a bonus for a small class size, see below).

A teacher may teach up to her Teaching ability x 5 students per season (minimum 1). If the teacher only has two students, each student gains +3 XP. If the teacher only has one, that student gains +6 XP.

You can increase arts with teaching, but only when being taught one-on-one (the +6 bonus still applies).

Studying Books

In order to learn from a book, you must be fluent in its language (at least level 4 in the language ability) and have a score in Artes Liberales (so you can read). There are two types of books: Summae can be studied repeatedly (as long as your level is lower than the book’s), while Tractatus can only be studied once (but don’t have a level cap). Both book types award XP based on their quality.

You can learn arts from a book. You can only learn supernatural abilities from a book if you already have at least level 1 in the ability. You cannot earn XP reading a Tractatus you wrote yourself.

Studying Vis

You can consume vis to learn an art. You must consume one pawn of vis for every five levels you already have in the ability (rounded up as usual, minimum 1 even if you have 0 levels).

Gain XP equal to the total of a stress die roll plus the local aura bonus.

If the roll botches, you must roll botch dice equal to the number of pawns consumed in the study. You can go into Twilight from this botch. You do not require a laboratory to study vis.

Writing Books

You can write a Summa or a Tractatus if you have at least level 2 in the ability (5 for an art), at least level 5 in the language you’re writing in, and an Artes Liberales score (so you can read). You can also make copies of existing books.

Summa

A Summa’s maximum level is half your level in the ability (and this will be the maximum ability level anyone can learn from the book). You can set this level even lower to increase the quality of the book.

The base quality of the book (the amount of XP gained by studying it) is equal to your Communication + 6 (and adds relevant virtues and flaws). If you write a book of lower level than your maximum, each decrease in level adds +1 quality for an art or +3 quality for other abilities. You cannot increase the total quality to more than double the base quality by lowering the level.

Each season of work on the Summa gains you points equal to your Communication + the Language you’re writing in. The book is complete once you accumulate points equal to the level (for arts) or the level x 5 (for abilities).

Tractatus

You may only write one Tractatus per season, and it always takes the full season. The final quality of the Tractatus (the amount of XP gained from studying it) is equal to your Communication + 6.

For any given ability, you may only write a total number of Tractatus based on your level. You can write one per 2 levels of an ability or per 5 levels of an art (rounded up, as normal). For example, if you have a level of 5 in Latin, you may only write three Tractatus on Latin until your level increases to at least 7 (each individual one takes a season; this is just the total wealth of knowledge you have to impart across multiple books).

Making Copies

By copying carefully, you may copy one Tractatus with a season of work. In one season, you may accumulate points toward copying a Summa equal to 6 + your Profession: Scribe, and you’ve copied it successfully once your points equal the Summa’s level.

You may copy quickly and triple either of those rates (three Tractatus or triple points), but this reduces the quality of the book by 1.

You can produce a useless, corrupted copy if you lack certain abilities. For any book, having a level of 2 or less in its language results in a corrupted copy. To copy a book about a supernatural ability, you must either have the ability or at least level 1 in the relevant Realm Lore for the ability. You must have at least 1 level in Magic Theory to copy books about arts or Parma Magica.

Learning Supernatural Abilities

To learn a new supernatural ability, you must have the Gift and must learn from a trainer or teacher (who must have the ability). You must achieve a level of at least 1 within the first season of training (i.e., total XP earned at least 5) or you cannot learn the ability.

For this initial season of training or teaching, you receive a penalty to the XP earned equal to the sum of all your levels in other supernatural abilities plus the sum of your levels in arts (minimum 15 if you have fewer than 15 levels in arts). For example, it requires the teacher to be able to generate at least 20 XP to train a supernatural ability to a mage with 15 or fewer art levels and no other supernatural abilities (i.e., the teacher needs a very high Communication and/or Teaching of 10+ to even attempt it).

Mystery Cults manage to avoid this with their particular supernatural abilities for people following their initiation rituals.

Reputations

Characters will often only have a single reputation. Reputations gained in play start at 1 for doing something that seems to be worthy of starting a reputation.

Each time the character does something noteworthy, apply a point to the character’s primary reputation. Treat the points as XP and the reputation as an ability (e.g., a reputation goes from 1 to 2 after getting 10 reputation points in it).

To reduce a bad reputation, you must generate a new reputation at 1. You can direct noteworthy actions that specifically support the new reputation to it rather than your primary (bad) reputation. Once the secondary (good) reputation is higher than the bad reputation, every time you should increase the good reputation by a level, you can instead reduce the bad reputation by a level.

When you have multiple reputations, you should roll both to see whether someone’s heard of you (and they’ve heard of whatever events support the reputation that succeeded).

Warping

If you spend extended time subjected to strong auras or other ongoing magic effects, they can warp you over time. You have both a Warping Score and Warping Points: the points are treated like XP for raising the score (which is treated like an ability). For example, once you have 5 Warping Points, you must exchange them to raise Warping Score from 0 to 1.

Warping Points can be gained from different types of supernatural sources, but are not tracked separately. You may still want to have an idea where most of the points come from, to determine the effects of being warped (e.g., from mystic auras vs. faerie auras).

Gaining Warping Points

There are four ways to gain Warping Points, which stack with each other: living in a strong aura, being affected by a powerful effect, being continuously under an effect, and botching a mystic ability roll.

Living in a Strong Aura

If you spend substantial time in an aura of strength 6+, you may gain Warping Points. If you are aligned with the aura type, you do not gain them (e.g., mages in a magic aura, fae-touched in a faerie aura, etc.).

With a frequency based on the severity of the aura (monthly to every other year), determine how much time you spent in the aura: Frequent Visits, Half-time Within, or Always Within. Use the most reasonable time frame (e.g., if you spent the vast majority of your time in the aura, even if you left from time to time, it’s Always Within). Frequent Visits means around a quarter of your time in the aura:

  • Frequent Visits: Gain 0 Warping Points for auras of 6-8, 1/year for strength 9, and 2/year for strength 10
  • Half-time Within: Gain 0 Warping Points for aura 6, 1 every 2 years for strength 7, 1/year for strength 8, 2/year for strength 9, and 1/season for strength 10
  • Always Within: Gain 1 Warping Point/year for auras of 6-7, 2/year for strength 8, 1/season for strength 9, and 1/month for strength 10

Affected by a Powerful Effect

If you are affected by an spell of magnitude 6 or higher (or an equivalently powerful supernatural effect), gain a Warping Point unless you were the source of that effect or it was carefully designed to work for you (e.g., Longevity Ritual). If the effect is continuous, it adds an additional Warping Point every season.

Continuously Under an Effect

If you are under the influence of an ongoing effect for at least half the year (including being under different effects, but being under some effect most of the time), you gain a Warping Point each year for each effect. This occurs even if it was cast by you or designed for you (e.g., everyone with a Longevity Ritual gains at least one Warping Point per year). It stacks with being continuously under the effect of a powerful effect (for 5 Warping Points per year that you are continuously under a powerful effect). There are a few exceptions:

  • You must be affected directly and personally (e.g., being inside an enchanted structure doesn’t count as continuously under an effect, though it may include an aura).
  • Aegis of the Hearth and Parma Magica don’t count (because of breakthroughs in their design by Bonisagus). Other direct, personal wards do.
  • Familiar binding and any powers attached to the bond do not count.

Botching a Mystical Ability

When you botch on a spell or supernatural ability roll, you gain one Warping Point for every 0 on the botch dice.

Effects of Warping

Hermetic magi are more likely to enter Twilight due to warping, and this replaces any other effects of warping.

Non-mages gain certain effects based on Warping Score:

  • At Warping Score 1, gain a Minor Flaw that reflects the source of most of the Warping Points. When this is from an aura, most people in the aura will gain a similar flaw related to the type of aura.
  • At Warping Score 3, gain a second Minor Flaw.
  • At Warping Score 5, gain a mystical Minor Virtue tied to the source of the points. This attunes you to the supernatural type of the virtue, so you no longer gain Warping Points from living in a strong aura of that type.
  • At Warping Score 6+, gain a Major Flaw for each new level.

Aging

Every Winter after turning 35, you must make an Aging Roll and compare the result to the Aging Table. The roll is a Stress Die + Age/10 (round up) – Modifiers. The stress die cannot botch, but can explode (and high numbers are bad).

Your modifier to the roll is based on virtues, living conditions, and your Longevity Ritual. The modifiers from virtues and the ritual are discussed in their sections. For living conditions:

  • Wealthy or healthy locations grant a bonus of 2 to anyone
  • A typical Summer or Autumn covenant provides a bonus of 2 to the mages living there and a bonus of 1 to everyone else
  • A typical Spring or Winter covenant provides a bonus of 1 to the mages living there (but no bonus to anyone else)
  • Most peasant living conditions have no bonus or penalty
  • Poor or unhealthy locations (such as being poor in a city) provide a penalty of 2 (i.e., it actually increases the aging roll result)

Consult the Aging Table on page 170 for results. Notably, reducing the result to 2 or less means no apparent aging, a result of 3 means you look a year older but suffer no penalties, a result of 10-12 means 1 Aging Point in a characteristic of your choice, and results of 13 and 22+ grant a Crisis in addition to other effects.

Aging Points are the typical result for younger individuals. Once the number of Aging Points in a characteristic equal its absolute value, reduce it by 1 and clear the Aging Points from the characteristic. For example, if you had a +3 or -3 in Quickness, it would take 3 Aging Points to reduce it (to +2 or -4, respectively).

In addition to applying each Aging Point to a characteristic, also track the total value of Aging Points you’ve ever earned across all characteristics. This is tracked as if it were XP for raising a Decrepitude ability (e.g., once you’ve accumulated 5 Aging Points, you gain Decrepitude 1). This might have other system effects, but primarily causes you to have a Crisis from strenuous activity at Decrepitude 4, and makes you completely bedridden and likely to die soon at Decrepitude 5.

When you suffer a Crisis (from the result on the Aging Table or from activity at high Decrepitude), roll a Simple Die + Age/10 (round up) + Decrepitude. If the result is 8 or less, you’re bedridden for a week, and if it’s 9-14 you’re bedridden for a month. Rolls higher than 14 result in increasingly worse illnesses. Consult the Aging Table and rules on page 170 for how to resolve these crises. Any roll for a crisis, even if it only results in being bedridden, requires you to refresh your Longevity Ritual as described in that section.

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